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4 days ago

onePT
So here we are with Tip 6 our Top 13 Tips to help us in our preparation for the ASICS Greater Manchester Marathon or any other event you may be taking part in later this year.

Tip 6. Have a plan?

Hopefully most people training for the 7th April will be well on their way by now with their training - there are just about 8 weeks to go!

But for those of you who are taking part in events later in the year and if you are new to running, a simple guide is to aim for 3 runs per week. Most race events do send out beginner, intermediate and advanced training programmes. 

Simply, shorter runs during the week allowing at least 1 rest day in between, and then a longer run at the weekend. This longer run should preferably be outdoors so you get used to running on the road. Also remember to vary your route so you are not always going / turning corners in the same direction to reduce the risk of picking up niggling injuries as your body puts more strain down one side compared to the other.
 
One way to start is to break up the running with walking breaks. As you become fitter, you can reduce the length of the walking break, until you can run continuously for the set distance.

Over the weeks, you should gradually increase the length of the runs, and especially the weekend run to approach the race distance

For many training schedules for marathons, the guide is to be able to get to around the 20-21 mile mark (For half marathons it is normally 10-12 miles in training).

Equally as you become fitter or if you are a little bit more experienced then you could try some interval sessions.

For example aim for 4-6 x 3 min efforts (or some people prefer to aim for distance - e.g. 800m - 1 km efforts). 

Between each effort - walk or jog for 3 minutes or for the same time it takes to cover the distance.

You should aim to keep the same pace (higher than your normal running pace) for the 3 minutes and keep this higher pace consistent over the efforts. If people are worried about too much impact, then these fitness sessions can also be performed on a bike. 

Finally, as you approach the main event, allow yourself a 2 weeks gap or taper before race day. This means you reduce the mileage in the 2 weeks before the race so you do not feel heavy legged on the occasion.

So if you need any further help or advice, please do not hesitate to get in touch. 

See you soon for the next tip.

In movement, health & wellbeing

Dr Neil Fell PhD
onept.co.uk
#TrainSmarter

So here we are with Tip 6 our Top 13 Tips to help us in our preparation for the ASICS Greater Manchester Marathon or any other event you may be taking part in later this year.

Tip 6. Have a plan?

Hopefully most people training for the 7th April will be well on their way by now with their training - there are just about 8 weeks to go!

But for those of you who are taking part in events later in the year and if you are new to running, a simple guide is to aim for 3 runs per week. Most race events do send out beginner, intermediate and advanced training programmes.

Simply, shorter runs during the week allowing at least 1 rest day in between, and then a longer run at the weekend. This longer run should preferably be outdoors so you get used to running on the road. Also remember to vary your route so you are not always going / turning corners in the same direction to reduce the risk of picking up niggling injuries as your body puts more strain down one side compared to the other.

One way to start is to break up the running with walking breaks. As you become fitter, you can reduce the length of the walking break, until you can run continuously for the set distance.

Over the weeks, you should gradually increase the length of the runs, and especially the weekend run to approach the race distance

For many training schedules for marathons, the guide is to be able to get to around the 20-21 mile mark (For half marathons it is normally 10-12 miles in training).

Equally as you become fitter or if you are a little bit more experienced then you could try some interval sessions.

For example aim for 4-6 x 3 min efforts (or some people prefer to aim for distance - e.g. 800m - 1 km efforts).

Between each effort - walk or jog for 3 minutes or for the same time it takes to cover the distance.

You should aim to keep the same pace (higher than your normal running pace) for the 3 minutes and keep this higher pace consistent over the efforts. If people are worried about too much impact, then these fitness sessions can also be performed on a bike.

Finally, as you approach the main event, allow yourself a 2 weeks gap or taper before race day. This means you reduce the mileage in the 2 weeks before the race so you do not feel heavy legged on the occasion.

So if you need any further help or advice, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

See you soon for the next tip.

In movement, health & wellbeing

Dr Neil Fell PhD
onept.co.uk
#TrainSmarter
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Thank you for going through my running plan with me yesterday. 🏃‍♀️🖤❤🏃‍♀️

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